European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum) What do you “bee-lieve?”

I found this bee yesterday at the San Juan Island Community Gardens (https://www.facebook.com/pages/San-Juan-Island-Community-Gardens/161100800613137?fref=ts). A friend helped me get it into a container so I could photograph and hopefully identify it. Took me awhile, but I believe it is a Wool Carder Bee (Antidium manicatum). I read a neat blog about how they are associated with the plant called Lamb’s Ear. Females scrape the “wool” off the leaves to line their nest and both sexes sip nectar from the plant’s flowers. Read more about them here… http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/?blogtag=Anthidium+manicatum&blogasset=45538

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool Carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool Carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

IMG_9605-European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

IMG_9604-European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

IMG_9603-European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

IMG_9602-European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

European Wool-carder bee (Anthidium manicatum)

 

My Dinner Guest

A very hungry bumble bee

I found out on my walk.

I invited her to dine with me,

And though she couldn’t talk…

 

She came along without protest

Happy to have me serve…

The wildflower blossom I picked for her,

Six-petaled bee hors d’oerve.

 

Once in the house, I seated her

As my honored guest,

Then I served her with a bee size drink…

My vintage nectar best!

 

A little sugar mixed

With water all together

And the happy bee was well revived

To survive this cold, spring weather.

 

She buzzed about and thanked me

For the sustenance,

And then she asked to be excused

With her little bumble dance.

 

I opened up my front door

To see her on her way

She said to look for her again

Some sunny summer day!

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Bombus mixtus or Mixed Bumble Bee queens emerge after overwintering to begin the process of making a nest (typically in the ground) where she will begin to make wax pots to lay her eggs in.  You can help save these important pollinators by reducing use of herbicides and lawn chemicals in your yard.  If you find one on a cold day, help it out by providing a boost of carbohydrate energy.  You can wet a sponge or cotton with sugar water or prepackaged hummingbird food and offer it a drink.  The hungry bee will thank you for it.  Remember to “bee” nice to bees!

***Text and photographs copyright 2012 by Cynthia Brast.  No part of this story may be reproduced in any form without the expressed written consent of the author.

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